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Latest CNAS in the Media

Taking a look at the risk of landslides in wildfire burn zones

KTVU -- University of California Riverside environmental sciences doctoral student James Guilinger joins Mornings on 2 to talk about his research into landslides and the increased risk in burn zones. James talks about the possible dramatic problems a small amount of rain can cause. He also chats about how to stay safe if you live...
By KTVU |

How much Matter Is in the Universe? Scientists finally find the number

POPULAR MECHANICS -- Scientists say they’ve calculated an answer to one of the thorniest questions in all of cosmology and physics: how much matter is in the universe? To find the best answer, the University of California, Riverside researchers combined robust mathematical models with existing knowledge of galaxy clusters, which helped them find the most...
By Caroline Delbert | Popular Mechanics |

UC Riverside creates on-campus testing lab, tests students twice per week

KNBC-TV / TELEMUNDO -- KNBC speaks with members of the UCR campus community about the new COVID-19 testing lab on campus. UC Riverside Creates On-Campus Testing Lab, Tests Students Twice Per Week KNBC speaks with members of the UCR campus community about the new COVID-19 testing lab on campus. Watch the video on KNBC-TV: Watch...
By KNBC-TV / TELEMUNDO |

1,000 years ago, humans drove birds to extinction in The Bahamas

Humans driving extinctions is nothing new. In North America, humans are likely responsible for the loss of ice age era mammoths and mastodons. in South America, humans — alongside climate change — led to the loss of many species, including giant ground slots. And, of course, we are currently driving the planet’s sixth mass extinction...
By Priya Shukla | Forbes |

UC Riverside unveils on-campus coronavirus testing lab

UC Riverside is doing its own testing for the novel coronavirus. The Inland Empire campus of about 25,000 students opened a COVID-19 testing laboratory in September and is processing 400 test samples per day, said Rodolfo Torres, vice chancellor for research and economic development. “We’ve been operating at full speed,” Torres said. And the university...
By David Downey | The Press-Enterprise |

Dr. Julia Bailey-Serres: Researching flood resistance in rice and other plants

PEOPLE BEHIND THE SCIENCE PODCAST -- Dr. Julia Bailey-Serres is Director of the Center for Plant Cell Biology and Distinguished Professor of Genetics at the University of California, Riverside. She also holds the University of California John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation Chair and is Professor of Rice Physiology at Utrecht University in the...
By PBtS Staff | People Behind the Science Podcast |

What's the matter with the Universe? Scientists have the answer

MSN NEWS -- A team of US astrophysicists has produced one of the most precise measurements ever made of the total amount of matter in the Universe, a longtime mystery of the cosmos. The answer, published in The Astrophysical Journal on Monday, is that matter accounts for 31.5 percent -- give or take 1.3 percent...
By Issam Ahmed | AFP |

Researchers working to grow algae for biofuels in the dark using solar energy

FORBES -- In the dark? That’s not how we normally think of plants being grown. But it’s a method that could be used to grow algae as a renewable fuel source, with even better results than regular ol’ sunlight. The researchers working on this are from University of California, Riverside (UCR) and it’s part of...
By Jeff Kart | Forbes |

UC Riverside wins grant to bring Artificial Intelligence to the Colorado River Basin

CA AG TODAY -- The University of California, Riverside recently won a $10 million grant to develop artificial intelligence to improve environmental and economic stability throughout the western U.S. Elia Scudiero is a Research Agronomist at UC Riverside. “This will bring together university personnel and Ag-Tech companies that will provide training that will serve the...
By Tim Hammerich | California Ag Today |

Venus phosphine find: Unexplained gas hints at potential for alien life

CNET -- Scientists have spotted something unexpected in the cloud decks of Venus, our nearest planetary neighbor. While no one is saying it's aliens just yet, some sort of alien microorganism is on the list of potential explanations for why a chemical that shouldn't be floating around above the planet has been observed there for...
By Eric Mack, Jackson Ryan | CNET |

Why does the West Coast’s sky look like literal Hell right now?

SLATE -- You know things have gone off the rails if people are arguing about whether it looks like Mars or Venus where they live. In case you missed it, fires are burning across the Western U.S., and thick wildfire smoke has enveloped regions of California and Oregon. As a result, residents of Salem and...
By Jane C. Hu | Slate |

New climate change prediction spells disaster for valley tourism

KESQ -- A Cathedral City student is sounding the alarm about climate change and potentially devastating effects on tourism in the Coachella Valley. Cindy Yañez is a graduate student researcher in earth system science. In a new climate change study for UC Riverside, she predicts increasing temperature could shorten the snowbird season by several months...
By Jake Ingrassia | KESQ News Channel 3 |

Experts on heat waves

UCR NEWS -- Robert Allen, assistant professor of climatology. Allen uses climate models in his research and can talk to reporters about how such models can improve our understanding of climate change. “Several observational studies have shown the frequency of occurrence of extreme warm temperatures has increased,” he says. rjallen@ucr.edu Cameron Barrows: Research ecologist at...
By Jules Bernstein | UCR News |

Your Coronavirus Test Is Positive. Maybe It Shouldn’t Be.

THE NEW YORK TIMES -- Some of the nation’s leading public health experts are raising a new concern in the endless debate over coronavirus testing in the United States: The standard tests are diagnosing huge numbers of people who may be carrying relatively insignificant amounts of the virus. Most of these people are not likely...
By Apoorva Mandavilli | The New York Times |

Monitoring Argentine Ant populations

CA AG TODAY -- The Argentine Ant is a problem in citrus orchards and vineyards mostly because it protects sap-sucking pests from natural predators. Entomologist Dr. Mark Hoddle and his team at UC Riverside have created a tool to help farmers more effectively manage these ants based on the fact that the like to move...
By Tim Hammerich | California Ag Today |

New Asian Citrus Psyllid Research set to begin in 2021

AGNET WEST -- An important research project looking at Asian citrus psyllid (ACP) is set to begin early next year. Extension Specialist at UC Riverside, Monique Rivera said they were recently notified that their new research project has been approved for funding support. The project is going to take a closer look at the phenology...
By Brian German | AgNet West |

Water contaminant could have neurotoxic effects on children

CANADIAN LIGHT SOURCE -- Manganese isn’t considered a major water contaminant in America, but a new study is taking a closer look at whether it should be. A naturally occurring metal, manganese can be found in water supplies throughout the world. Over time, excessive ingestion of manganese can produce cognitive disabilities in children and symptoms...
By Victoria Schramm | Canadian Light Source |

The new pandemic hobby: gazing at the stars

WALL STREET JOURNAL -- It's too hot to bake yet another peach pie and too late in the season to start a victory garden, but it is a prime time to ponder the night sky. More than 60 places around the country have been designated as exemplary stargazing sites by the International Dark-Sky Association, which...
By Adam H. Graham | Wall Street Journal |

Some stars could support as many as 7 habitable planets

UNIVERSE TODAY -- In recent decades, over 4,000 extrasolar planets have been confirmed beyond our Solar System. With so many planets available for study, astronomers have learned a great deal about the types of planets that exist out there and what kind of conditions are prevalent. For instance, they have been able to get a...
By Matt Williams | Universe Today |

The Bugs and the Bees: A guide to Entomology outreach, even during a pandemic

ENTOMOLOGY TODAY -- Insects have important roles as both heroes and villains, as well as neutral house guests either feared or ignored, and their ubiquity makes them accessible to both civilians and scientists. Entomology outreach is an essential part of inviting the public to learn about these characters. Frequently, graduate students are at the forefront...
By Tessa Shates for Entomolgy Today |
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