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Latest CNAS in the Media

U.S. national academy picks record number of women, minorities

The U.S. National Academy of Sciences (NAS) chooses its members in a process that has long discriminated against female and minority scientists, as well as those from less prestigious universities. But NAS officials have begun to tinker with that process with the goal of increasing gender, racial, and geographic diversity. And this year’s class, announced...
By Jeffrey Mervis | ScienceMag |

Is California suffering a decades-long megadrought?

California has entered another drought. But depending on whom you ask, the last one may have never really ended. Some researchers believe the region is actually more than two decades into an emerging “megadrought” — a hydrological event that is on par with the worst dry spells of the last millennium. Except this time, they...
By Alex Wigglesworth | LATimes |

UC Riverside has high share of underserved students. But funding gap prompts equity debate

Casaundra Caruso was nearly a straight-A student when she transferred from San Bernardino Valley College to UC Riverside in fall 2019. But that quickly — and disastrously — changed. She was overwhelmed by UC Riverside’s fast-paced quarter system and flummoxed by the process of transferring her credits to Riverside. She didn’t know how to seek...
By Teresa Watanabe |

UC Riverside lectures on COVID-19 research begin Tuesday, April 6

A series of lectures starting Tuesday, April 6, at UC Riverside will highlight the COVID-19 contributions of researchers at UCR’s College of Natural and Agricultural Sciences, including testing and vaccine development. The college’s annual science lecture series is titled “COVID Conversations: How the College of Natural & Agricultural Sciences at UC Riverside is combating the...
By Ryan Hagen |

UC Riverside student sees art as way to make statements

Megan Hsu described art as always having been a creative outlet with infinite possibilities and freedoms for her to express herself without using words to tell stories. “Since I was little, I loved being able to capture precious moments through scribbles with crayons, stick figures or shapes,” the 20-year-old said She explained that, when she...
By Patrick Brien |

The Inimitable F. N. David: A Renaissance Statistician

Florence Nightingale David (1909–1993) was known to readers of her scholarly publications as “F. N. David” and to her colleagues as “David” or “FND.” David has been recognized as the leading, most accomplished and most memorable British woman statistician of the mid-20th cen-tury ([11], [14]). She was a professor at University College London (UCL), and...
By Amanda L. Golbeck and Craig A. Molgaard |

Plan to Ditch the Mask After Vaccination? Not So Fast.

With 50 million Americans at least partly immunized against the coronavirus, and millions more joining the ranks every day, the urgent question on many minds is: When can I throw away my mask? It’s a deeper question than it seems — about a return to normalcy, about how soon vaccinated Americans can hug loved ones...
By Apoorva Mandavilli | NYTimes |

Need a Book With That Spider?

Late last month, Anne Danielson-Francois, an associate biology professor at the University of Michigan, received an unusual package. She had instructed the sender to make sure the contents — spiders — were cushioned because she did not want their legs to break off. When Dr. Danielson-Francois opened the little brown box, there they were —...
By Christine Hauser |

So, Turns Out That New-Car Smell We All Love Is a Carcinogenic

Esquire — We hate to be the bearer of bad news, but... you know that new-car smell you love? Well, apparently, it's not just an amazing plus that comes with buying new wheels. It's actually a bunch of toxic fumes AKA carcinogens. We really can't have good things, can we? A new study on car...
By Paolo Chua | Esquire |

Stuck in traffic? Americans with longer commutes could be inhaling dangerously high levels of carcinogens, study says

USA TODAY — We You might be inhaling dangerous, cancer-causing carcinogens during your commute. That's according to a new study from the University of California, Riverside, which found that drivers who spend more than 20 minutes in their cars are at risk of exposure to formaldehyde and benzene. Both are toxic chemicals embedded in vehicle...
By Elinor Aspegren | USA Today |

Giving Food Waste A New Life

FORBES — World renown chef Thomas Keller once said “Respect for food is a respect for life, for who we are and what we do.” However, currently 40% of the nation’s food goes uneaten — over 66 million tons a year — and the results are widespread, from those who go hungry to a taxation...
By Jordan Strickler | Forbes |

Too much fat and sugar as a kid can have long-term health effects, study finds

THE ATLANTA JOURNAL-CONSTITUTION — Eating too much fat and sugar as a child can alter your microbiome for years, even if you adopt a healthy lifestyle later, a new study on mice suggests. The study, by researchers at the University of California Riverside, is one of the first “to show a significant decrease in the...
By Nancy Clanton | The Atlanta Journal-Constitution |

Research Network to Take Comprehensive Look at Bee Health

AG NET WEST — A new research network will be taking a multifaceted look at ways to improve bee health. The project is being made possible through a $900,000 grant from the University of California’s Office of the President. Researchers and engineers from Riverside, Davis, San Diego, and Merced campuses will all be participating in...
By Brian German | AG Net West |

If You Squeeze the Coronavirus, Does It Shatter?

THE NEW YORK TIMES — Of all the pandemic questions bedeviling scientists, the one that Juan Perilla is asking might be among the strangest: If a shrunk-down hand were to squeeze the coronavirus, would it squish, or would it shatter? Viruses like H.I.V. tend to be on the softer side, smooshing down like a foam...
By Katherine J. Wu | The New York Times |

Why palm trees are dying in San Diego County

SAN DIEGO — Canary Island Palms are dying across San Diego County. Scientists said it's from a weevil infestation. "It's estimated that 10,000 palms have been killed by the South American palm weevil," said Mark Hoddle. Hoddle is with UC Riverside. He described how the weevils attack. "These long nose weevils use it to drill...
By Shawn Styles | CBSB |

Delicious and Disease-free: Scientists Attempting New Citrus Varieties

USDA — University of California Riverside (UCR) scientists are betting an ancient solution will solve citrus growers’ biggest problem by breeding new fruits with natural resistance to a deadly tree disease. The hybrid fruits will ideally share the best of their parents’ attributes: the tastiness of the best citrus, and the resistance to Huanglongbing, or...
By USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture |

Local Efforts To Save The Honey Bee

LAIST— Researchers at UC Riverside are launching a multi-campus project to save the declining honey bee population. Honey bees play a critical role in growing about one-third of the world's food, and they pollinate more than 80 types of agricultural crops. Dwindling populations mean those crops lessen, and become more expensive. Experts at the university...
By Julia Paskin | LAist |

UC Riverside Teams Up to Reverse Honeybee Decline

KVCR — UC Riverside announced Thursday that it is leading one of the nation’s largest research initiatives to reverse a decline in honeybees which threatens food crops and prices. With a 900,000 dollar grant, U.C. Riverside will help lead a group of researchers from U.C. Davis, San Diego and Merced campuses looking for solutions to...
By Megan Jamerson | KVCR |

UC Riverside scientists fight citrus greening disease by breeding new fruit

THE PRESS-ENTERPRISE — Tucked behind twists and turns of dusty roads and acres of groves at UC Riverside’s agriculture research station are hybrid trees with golf-ball-size fruit that offer hope in the fight against a disease threatening California’s iconic citrus industry. Since 2013, UCR scientists have been trying to breed citrus varieties that resist Huanglongbing...
By David Downey | The Press-Enterprise |

Scent as a motivational muse

CHEMICAL & ENGINEERING NEWS — A whiff to inspire workouts As an unpredictable year ends, many of us still turn to a predictable resolution for the new year: to get more exercise. But what if your sense of smell could move you to move more? Researchers at the University of California, Riverside, think that might...
By Leigh Krietsch Boerner | Chemical and Engineering News |
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