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Latest CNAS in the Media

Joshua Tree National Park is more popular than ever — but its namesake trees are facing extinction

VOGUE — In a wilderness area at the northwest corner of Joshua Tree National Park, ecologist Lynn Sweet treks across the high desert as raucous pinyon jays swoop overhead. She navigates carefully across the landscape of blackbrush and fragrant junipers to inspect the stump of a Joshua tree. Much of the tree’s trunk, branches, and...
By Miles W. Griffis | VOGUE |

The 10 biggest (non-COVID!) science stories you might have missed in 2020

UC NEWS -- 2020’s news cycle was dominated by COVID-19 stories, and for good reason: It’s been a year like no other. However, there were plenty of groundbreaking discoveries in 2020 that didn’t get the spotlight they deserved. These stories would have been big news in any other year, but were often overshadowed by the...
By Rana Freedman | University of California News |

UC Riverside receives more than $4 million for avocado anti-fungus research

KESQ -- UC Riverside received more than $4 million in federal funds to research methods of shielding avocados from a fungus that can be devastating to crops in California and elsewhere, it was announced today. The U.S. Department of Agriculture awarded the university a $4.4 million grant as part of its National Institute of Food...
By Staff | KESQ |

How you can help count and conserve native bees

NEW YORK TIMES -- In the last 20 years, the rusty patched bumblebee population declined by 87 percent because of habitat loss, use of pesticides and disease. This fuzzy bee, native to the continental United States, gets its name from the rusty patch on its back. These bumblebees pollinate fruits and vegetables we eat, unlike...
By Michele C. Hollow | The New York Times |

Understanding bacteria’s metabolism could improve biofuel production

GREEN CAR CONGRESS -- Researchers at UC Riverside and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory have used mathematical and computational modeling, artificial intelligence algorithms and experiments showing that bacteria have failsafe mechanisms preventing them from producing too many metabolic intermediates. Metabolic intermediates are the chemicals that couple each reaction to one another in metabolism. Key to these...
By Staff | Green Car Congress |

Your nose could be the key to getting fit, a study in mice suggests

BBC SCIENCE FOCUS -- A whiff of your gym bag might make you wince, but your nose could be the key to getting fit. New research in mice suggests there is a link between doing voluntary exercise and the expression of genes that relate to scent perception. Rodents are used in scientific research for various...
By Amy Barrett | BBC Science Focus Magazine |

Megalodons, the ocean’s most ferocious prehistoric predators, raised their young in nurseries

SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTE -- Millions of years ago, monstrously sized sharks named megalodons dominated the ocean. These giants grew larger than modern day humpback whales, casually snacked on animals like dolphins and seals, had the strongest bite force of any creature to ever exist—yes, including T. rex. But despite being fierce predators, a new study published...
By Rasha Aridi | Smithsonian Institute |

Need motivation to exercise? Olfaction is a primal motivator

PSYCHOLOGY TODAY -- Olfaction may play an important role in the motivation to seek voluntary exercise, according to a new study. The University of California, Riverside (UCR) researchers speculate that "individual differences of exercise habit may be accounted for by a differentiated perception of specific smells." How are certain smells linked to exercise motivation? The...
By Christopher Bergland | Psychology Today |

Common flame retardant chemicals cause mice offspring to develop diabetes

IFL SCIENCE -- Chemicals commonly used in flame retardants can lead to diabetes in the offspring of female mice exposed to them, according to a study published in Scientific Reports. The substances are known as polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs). For the study, the scientists exposed mice to low levels of PBDEs during their pregnancy and...
By Staff | IFL Science |

Newly found proteins stop fungal “bleeding”

THE SCIENTIST -- Mycelium is the fabric of fungal populations: fungi produce thread-like roots called hyphae, which branch and fuse with one another to form a vast, interconnected network—the mycelium. It allows fungi to grow rapidly, transport nutrients, and even share information about the local environment over long distances. The network is also vulnerable; a...
By Viviane Callier | The Scientist online |

Making sense of biologicals: biological delivering targeted ant bait sustainably

AG NET WEST -- Ants can be a compounding issue for growers. Although the pest doesn’t always directly impact the crop or quality, they do hinder protective measures. UC Riverside Biological Control Specialist Dr. Mark Hoddle said ants quickly became a big problem in their citrus research when releasing the parasitic wasp tamarixia radiata. Hoddle...
By Staff | AG Net West |

How algae survived a mass extinction

SCIENCE FRIDAY -- Sixty-six million years ago when an asteroid slammed into what is now the Yucatan peninsula, it set off a period of near global darkness for almost two years. Scientists think a majority of land species went extinct during that time, but what was going on in the planet’s oceans? And how were...
By Ira Flotow | Science Friday |

Wildfires spark burn recovery study at 9 UC Natural Reserves

August wildfires incinerated tens of thousands of acres across seven UC Natural Reserves and affected parkland adjacent to two more reserves. This fall, the UC Natural Reserve System (NRS) will deploy rapid response teams to characterize the extent and intensity of the burns, as well as the effects of wildfire on a wide range of...
By Kathleen Wong | UCR NRS |

Q & A with Dr. Xuemei Chen

SCIENCE DIRECT -- Xuemei Chen grew up in the northeastern city of Harbin in China and received her BS degree in Biology from Peking University in Beijing. She came to the USA in 1989 to pursue her PhD at Cornell University. Under the supervision of David Stern at the Boyce Thompson Institute, she used molecular...
By ScienceDirect Staff |

Algae survived the post-dinosaur-killing asteroid darkness by eating other creatures

IFL SCIENCE -- One of the most extraordinary things about the impact of an asteroid that hit Earth 66 million years ago is not what died, but what survived. A new study found that one order of marine algae made it through by changing its source of energy, feeding on other life forms instead of...
By Stephen Luntz | IFL Science |

Termites can’t hide from heat and essential oils, finds UCCE study

UC ANR -- Termites can eat you out of house and home by chewing through wood and weakening the structure. The results of a new termite study led by entomologists at UC Riverside may enable homeowners to rid their homes of termites with a safer, effective pest control approach. “Combining a volatile essential oil with...
By Pamela Kan-Rice | UC Agricultural & Natural Resources |

Taking a look at the risk of landslides in wildfire burn zones

KTVU -- University of California Riverside environmental sciences doctoral student James Guilinger joins Mornings on 2 to talk about his research into landslides and the increased risk in burn zones. James talks about the possible dramatic problems a small amount of rain can cause. He also chats about how to stay safe if you live...
By KTVU |

How much Matter Is in the Universe? Scientists finally find the number

POPULAR MECHANICS -- Scientists say they’ve calculated an answer to one of the thorniest questions in all of cosmology and physics: how much matter is in the universe? To find the best answer, the University of California, Riverside researchers combined robust mathematical models with existing knowledge of galaxy clusters, which helped them find the most...
By Caroline Delbert | Popular Mechanics |

UC Riverside creates on-campus testing lab, tests students twice per week

KNBC-TV / TELEMUNDO -- KNBC speaks with members of the UCR campus community about the new COVID-19 testing lab on campus. UC Riverside Creates On-Campus Testing Lab, Tests Students Twice Per Week KNBC speaks with members of the UCR campus community about the new COVID-19 testing lab on campus. Watch the video on KNBC-TV: Watch...
By KNBC-TV / TELEMUNDO |

1,000 years ago, humans drove birds to extinction in The Bahamas

Humans driving extinctions is nothing new. In North America, humans are likely responsible for the loss of ice age era mammoths and mastodons. in South America, humans — alongside climate change — led to the loss of many species, including giant ground slots. And, of course, we are currently driving the planet’s sixth mass extinction...
By Priya Shukla | Forbes |
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