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Content Marked with: Department of Entomology

Monitoring Argentine Ant populations

CA AG TODAY -- The Argentine Ant is a problem in citrus orchards and vineyards mostly because it protects sap-sucking pests from natural predators. Entomologist Dr. Mark Hoddle and his team at UC Riverside have created a tool to help farmers more effectively manage these ants based on the fact that the like to move...
By Tim Hammerich | California Ag Today |

New Asian Citrus Psyllid Research set to begin in 2021

AGNET WEST -- An important research project looking at Asian citrus psyllid (ACP) is set to begin early next year. Extension Specialist at UC Riverside, Monique Rivera said they were recently notified that their new research project has been approved for funding support. The project is going to take a closer look at the phenology...
By Brian German | AgNet West |

Long-distance palm weevil flyers threaten California date palms

ENTOMOLOGY TODAY -- How long and how fast an invasive insect travels are important questions to determine the insect’s impact on plant (or animal) hosts. A new study by University of California, Riverside, researchers shows that Rhynchophorus palmarum, also known as the American or black palm weevil, can fly much further and faster than expected...
By Andrew Porterfield | Entomology Today |

The Bugs and the Bees: A guide to Entomology outreach, even during a pandemic

ENTOMOLOGY TODAY -- Insects have important roles as both heroes and villains, as well as neutral house guests either feared or ignored, and their ubiquity makes them accessible to both civilians and scientists. Entomology outreach is an essential part of inviting the public to learn about these characters. Frequently, graduate students are at the forefront...
By Tessa Shates for Entomolgy Today |

Student Life awards 15 organizations for their contributions to UCR and beyond

Each year, UC Riverside’s Student Life office selects 15 exemplary organizations — of the more than 500 student groups that exist — to include in its annual Student Organization Awards celebration. This week, Student Life announced the winners via a virtual Student Organization Awards ceremony. Among the most coveted awards is the Organization of the...
By Sandra Baltazar Martinez | Inside UCR |

Everything you’ve ever wanted to know about bees

World Bee Day is May 20. To mark the occasion, we gathered some of UC Riverside’s top bee experts to answer questions submitted on our Instagram page. The response created, for lack of a better term, quite a buzz! We got so many questions — hundreds — that we could not answer them all on...

They’re not really called ‘murder hornets.’ And they’re probably not as bad as you think

LA TIMES -- When news of the Asian giant hornet’s arrival in the United States first broke, the public was understandably worried: First the coronavirus, now “murder hornets”? What’s next, three days of darkness? But bug experts from Washington, where the hornet was discovered in the U.S., to California agree that the 2-inch hornet is...
By Faith E. Pinho | LA Times |

'Murder Hornets' are in the United States. These other dangerous bugs are more common

USA TODAY -- An invasive hornet species that slaughters honeybees and can be deadly to humans is sparking concern in the United States. A small number of "murder hornets," an invasive species of Asian giant hornet, have been spotted in the Pacific Northwest. While experts have been tracking the invasive species in the U.S. for...
By N'dea Yancey-Bragg | USA Today |

Murder hornets in the U.S. are dangerous, but entomologists say don’t panic

BUSTLE -- The world has been abuzz (yep, pun totally intended) about the arrival of the Asian giant hornet, otherwise known by the charming nickname "murder hornet," in North America. The New York Times reports that they've been found in Vancouver Island and Washington State, and there's a concern that scientists won't be able to...
By JR Thorpe | Bustle |

Want to save your citrus trees? Start a full-fledged insect war

LA TIMES --Growing citrus is a dicey business these days in Southern California, and not at all recommended if you live within a two-mile radius of a tree infected with Huanglongbing disease — a.k.a. HLB or citrus greening disease. However, if you live outside a “red zone” and you’re willing to actively fight the disease...
By Jeanette Marrantos | LA Times |
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