When the ocean got hot, the sharks bulked up

POPULAR SCIENCE - A giant spike in ocean temperatures about 93 million years ago may have helped sharks grow from stubby bottom dwellers into bigger predators. This surge in ocean heat in the Cretaceous period came from a gush of volcanic lava that sent carbon dioxide levels skyrocketing. This created a greenhouse effect that raised...
By Laura Baisas | Popular Science |

Fearsome Sharks of Today Evolved When Ancient Oceans Got Hot

THE NEW YORK TIMES - It sounds like something out of a Hollywood film script, but it really happened: Shark-evolution researchers say that increased ocean temperatures more than 100 million years ago may have caused sharks to grow bigger, swim faster and become the powerful predators we know today. In a paper published last month...
By Jeanne Timmons | The New York Times |

93 million years ago, climate change turned sharks into open-water apex predators

ZME SCIENCE - Modern sharks, those apex predators of the open ocean, might have actually evolved from bottom-dwellers during a significant episode of global warming millions of years ago. A new University of California, Riverside (UCR) study published in Current Biology has unveiled the adaptive fin morphology of sharks in response to historical climate changes...
By Jordan Strickler | ZME Science |

Underwater volcanoes made sharks more fierce: scientists

NEWSWEEK - Ancient underwater volcanic eruptions may have made modern day sharks more fierce then their predecessors, a new study has found. The infamous shark species we know of today evolved from stubby bottom dwellers around 93 million years ago when a spew of lava poured into the ocean, the study reported. This caused carbon...
By Robyn White | Newsweek |

Medium-sized dogs have a greater risk of developing cancer

EARTH.COM - Medium-sized dog breeds are more prone to cancer than both the smallest and the largest breeds, according to a recent study led by the University of California, Riverside. These findings challenge the multistage model of cancer, which associates increased size within a single species to a heightened risk of cancer due to more...
By Andrei Ionescu | Earth.com |

These dog breeds have a higher likelihood of getting cancer, according to new research

ABC NEWS - Researchers have discovered which dog breeds are more likely to get cancer, and the results disprove the notion that the largest dogs have a higher risk of the disease. It turns out that large -- but not the largest -- dog breeds generally have the highest cancer risk, according to the study...
By Julia Jacobo | ABC News |

This might be the first newborn great white shark ever recorded

NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC - For as much time and money as people have spent studying and filming great white sharks, no one has ever witnessed one being born. But new footage out of California might be the next best thing. On July 9, 2023, filmmaker Carlos Gauna and organismal biologist Phillip Sternes were following sharks with...
By Jason Bittel | National Geographic |

A 'holy grail': Why 2 Californians believe they have the first footage of a white shark's birth

USA TODAY - A wildlife filmmaker and a biology student believe they may have captured the first-ever footage of a newborn great white shark. Carlos Gauna, a wildlife filmmaker, and Phillip Sternes, a UC Riverside biology doctoral student, used a drone to film a 5-foot-long white shark swimming 1,300 feet off the coast of Carpinteria...
By Doc Louallen | |

Has great white shark newborn been caught on film for the first time?

BBC - As far as experts are aware, the birth of a great white shark has never been witnessed, but Carlos Gauna may have captured the closest thing to that. Carlos has found fame on YouTube as TheMalibuArtist and has filmed incredible shots of sharks from above with his drone. "You're basically viewing the sharks...
By James Clayton | BBC |

California Boasts World First Sighting of a Baby Great White Shark

NEWSWEEK - For the first time, a live baby great white shark has been spotted in the wild. The shark was around 5 feet long already and pure white, unlike its grey-colored adult counterparts, leading scientists to believe it could be a baby great white, according to a new paper discussing the finding in the...
By Jess Thomson | Newsweek |
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